Category Archives: Prayer

Earth Day Prayer

Infinite Spirit, sometimes called Grandfather, Grandmother —
Father Sky, Earth Mother, Creator:

We gather to praise your creation,
to honor the swimmers and crawlers,
the four-leggeds and the winged ones;
we give thanks for the beauty and glory of creation
and open our hearts to new ways to understand
our place in the universe—not the center or focus,
but a humble and balanced place,
where every step we take becomes a prayer,
where every word we say
makes harmony with the vast, vibrating cosmos,
and where we know we are singing the song of life.

We pray to know more deeply that we are in the Garden
where every plant and animal and speck of dust
is a living prayer.
Without our brothers and sisters
of the plant and animal and mineral kingdoms,
the human family would end.
So we want to bless them, as they bless us.

We pray for humility—
not to humble ourselves before presidents or priests,
but before the ants and trees—
for if we cannot be in true relation to the ant,
we shall be outcasts of the garden.

Let us cast the pollution from our eyes
so we can see the glory and live with thanksgiving.

Great Spirit, let us remember
it is not how we talk but how we walk.
When we say we love animals, let us protect them.
When we say we that we love the plant people,
let us honor them by living lightly on the earth.
When we say we love the minerals,
let us use them only in necessity,
and remember their rightful places.
Oil belongs in the ground,
not in the air through our wasteful machines.

Wondrous trees, breathing life into the atmosphere:
your gifts of fire and shelter, fruit,
and sailing are precious to us.
And in many ways you offer us leaves of knowledge.

May the vision of mutual interrelatedness,
cosmic interdependence,
the seamless process of generations,
not end in cough-filled skies blotting the sun,
but rather may clear air, healthy forrests,
wholesome water, expansive prairie, and pungent earth
nourish paths for all creatures
through mountain and valley, and the salt sea,
and through a protective atmosphere,
as we rejoice in the inhabitants.

Hear and empower our mantra: reduce, reuse, recycle.

With thanks for the surprise and mystery of it all,
we pray in the name of the Creator,
the Processes and Presences, and all our relations.

(“Earth Day Prayer: In the Spirit of Indigenous Traditions” by Vern Barnet, via UUA’s Prayers for Worship online page)

Advertisements

wage peace

Wage peace with your breath.

Breathe in firemen and rubble,
breathe out whole buildings and flocks of red wing blackbirds.

Breathe in terrorists
and breathe out sleeping children and freshly mown fields.

Breathe in confusion and breathe out maple trees.

Breathe in the fallen and breathe out lifelong friendships intact.

Wage peace with your listening: hearing sirens, pray loud.

Remember your tools: flower seeds, clothes pins, clean rivers.

Make soup.

Play music, memorize the words for thank you in three languages.

Learn to knit, and make a hat.

Think of chaos as dancing raspberries,
imagine grief
as the outbreath of beauty
or the gesture of fish.

Swim for the other side.

Wage peace.

Never has the world seemed so fresh and precious:

Have a cup of tea and rejoice.

Act as if armistice has already arrived.
Celebrate today.

Judyth Hill, written the day after 9/11

…not sure when/where I found this one, but its been written in my personal grimoire for some time now


A Prayer for America

God of many names,

You who has endowed us with the inalienable rights of Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness,
Let us remember this day that in this country there is no national religion,
There is no superior race
There is no preferable gender or orientation.

We gather holding a common value
That the glory of this country
rests first and foremost in its diversity.
Out of many ideas,
Out of many beliefs,
Out of many views,
Out of many voices,
Out of many passions,
Out of many experiences,
We are one.

Help us O God, to never forget
that we need not be alike
to live and love alike.

We ask for forgiveness this day
For our national and individual transgressions …
When we have chosen inaction or silence
in the face of injustice,
and abuse of power —
and our failure to claim our own.

We ask for forgiveness for
When we have not known our own neighbor, Fed our hungry, or equipped our future generation with Knowledge and love.

We ask for a blessing on this nation

according to our own faith and forms
And pledge our voice in support of moving closer and closer to freedom.

These and the prayers of our hearts we pray now in the silence…

In the names of those who have come before
And those who are yet to be,
In the names of all of the helpers of humankind

Amen

(“Prayer for America” by Tamara Lebak via UUA’s Prayers for Worship online)


Earth, teach me

Earth teach me quiet ~ as the grasses are still with new light.
Earth teach me suffering ~ as old stones suffer with memory.
Earth teach me humility ~ as blossoms are humble with beginning.
Earth teach me caring ~ as mothers nurture their young.
Earth teach me courage ~ as the tree that stands alone.
Earth teach me limitation ~ as the ant that crawls on the ground.
Earth teach me freedom ~ as the eagle that soars in the sky.
Earth teach me acceptance ~ as the leaves that die each fall.
Earth teach me renewal ~ as the seed that rises in the spring.
Earth teach me to forget myself ~ as melted snow forgets its life.
Earth teach me to remember kindness ~ as dry fields weep with rain.

~Ute prayer*

*Disclaimer: I am generally hesitant to post things that are attributed to indigenous peoples without some careful research and thought… I’ve found that many so-called Native American prayers, sayings, etc (as well as those from other groups) are often not actually from said group or person, and even when they are there’s the problem of translation, and then the problem of whether or not its appropriation. I had this written in an old journal, I’m not sure anymore where I heard or read it to write it down. I’m pretty sure I got this from the book Earth Prayers From Around the World ed. by Elizabeth J. Roberts and Elias Adimon, which I’ve had for years and probably wrote in that old journal for either the summer camp I was a counselor at, or the yearly Boundary Waters canoeing trip I took in high school and college. I’ve been unable to find any other information or source for it than that book.


a prayer for this world

The following is a prayer from the 1910 Prayers for the Social Awakening by Walter Rauschenbusch. This prayer is the origin for the prayer incorrecly attributed to St. Basil the Great that I posted yesterday.

O God, we thank thee for this universe, our great home; for its vastness and its riches, and for the manifoldness of the life which teems upon it and of which we are part. We praise thee for the arching sky and the blessed winds, for the driving clouds and the constellations on high. We praise thee for the salt sea and the running water, for the everlasting hills, for the trees and for the grass under our feet. We thank thee for our senses by which we can see the splendor of the morning, and hear the jubilant songs of love, and smell the breath of the springtime. Grant us, we pray thee, a heart wide open to all this joy and beauty, and save our souls from being so steeped in care or so darkened by passion that we pass heedless and unseeing when even the thorn-bush by the wayside is aflame with the glory of God.

Enlarge within us the sense of fellowship with all the living things, our little brothers, to whom thou hast given this earth as their home in common with us. We remember with shame that in the past we have exercised the high dominion of man with ruthless cruelty, so that the voice of the Earth, which should have gone up to thee in song, has been a groan of travail. May we realize that they live not for us alone, but for themselves and for thee, and that they love the sweetness of life even as we, and serve thee in their place better than we in ours.

When our use of this world is over and we make room for others, may we not leave anything ravished by our greed or spoiled by our ignorance, but may we hand on our common heritage fairer and sweeter through our use of it, undiminished in fertility and joy, that so our bodies may return in peace to the great mother who nourished them and our spirits may round the circle of a perfect life in thee.


a prayer of connection

O God, enlarge within us the sense of
fellowship with all living things,
our brothers the animals to whom thou
gavest the earth as their home in
common with us.

We remember with shame that in the past
we have exercised the high dominion
of man with ruthless cruelty
so that the voice of the earth,
which should have gone up to thee
in song, has been a groan of travail.

May we realize that they live not for
us alone but for themselves and for
thee, and that they love
the sweetness of live.

(this prayer is incorrectly attributed to St. Basil the Great, I figured that,in light of the recent encyclical of Pope Francis, it seemed apropriate–obviously, it is quite simple to adapt for gods)


A prayer for hard times

These woods are dark
this path is shadowed
walk with me
and hold me fast in your grace
that I might banish my fears
that I might overcome what lies ahead
with your blessing
I will emerge from this darkness
and breathe free again
So mote it be

(Diane Sylvan)

This is one of my favorite bits from Diane Sylvan’s Circle of One.